A Cleansing Baptism or Clandestine From of Femicide?

In the literary analysis of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew the work has been analyzed as the marriage between two willing partners whose final conclusion ends as a form of “baptism” or “cleansing”, which coincidentally can also be analyzed as the path of normal growth which ultimately takes place between to “civilized” people of marriage who often find themselves in conflict with one another and is symbolic to Bram Dijkstra’s Idols of Perversity: Fantasies of feminine evil in the fin de siècle culture. In this post, I make a literary as well as philosophical connection in comparative literature between religious baptism and Dante’s Purgatorio and William Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew and the “baptism” of electronic targeted physical assaults and psychotronic torture of Group (Gang) Stalking. That is to say, as “a cleansing experience that wipes clean” the memory, social status, and other blemishes of identity the targeted victim represents to society. Certainly, the transcendental often spoken of as happening in marriage between a man and a woman, and in regard to the analysis of The Taming of The Shrew and which, at least to me, seems always in favor of the male, ruling authority, or controlling power figure. In fact, the entire above referenced literary comparison between the two sources is done with the couples agreed upon consent and intentions toward some type of marriage. I then make a contrasting comparison between Group (Gang) Stalking with electronic targeted physical assault and psychotronic torture and the marriage contract or partnership/friendship that has dissolved between the group stalker and the victim’s intention to render the partnership as dissolved, the group stalker continues some type of arrangement with regard to the partnership. For where would a group stalker be without their intended victim? In other words, a former love interest of the victim, someone familiar to the victim such as a friend or business associate, or even a possibly a perturbed neighbor has suffered a narcissistic blow either by the victim themselves or as a result of the victim’s unintentional actions.

Please keep in mind that in regard to William Shakespeare’s Taming of The Shrew the reference to “supernatural happiness” and “overall happiness” alluded to by academic analysis belonging to “virtuous activities.” That is to say, happiness is not found in prostituting oneself, being highly selfish and narcissistic, or in other such activities that promote impurities such as drunkenness and other lude, wild behaviors such as being outspoken, opinionated, or promiscuous. This concept is directly promoted by institutions of higher learning because it benefits the economy and social welfare of society by promoting shared work responsibilities between committed partners such as paying taxes, buying real estate, and contributing to desired social values. This contributes to the benefits of promoting the shared values within a society (community), a group, by creating cohesive groups rooted in shared values of upstanding lifestyle. It also promotes and ensures the continuity of the growth of families as having children results in most marriage arrangements. All of which is true and, and in fact, should be promoted to young academics in pursuit of knowledge and understanding of virtuous behavior. However, it unwittingly also contributes to the formation of myth-making, the kinds of myths that have been witnessed as religious inquisitions, witch trials, and genocides.

In the Taming of the Shrew, the role of the shrew is acted by Katherine, and she is known for her negative outlook concerning life. She does not believe that there is good in anything and is often in an extremely foul mood. The main reason why she acts in such a manner is because she envies her beautiful and younger sister known as Bianca. She is envious of her younger sister who had many suitors, while she did not have any. Many men wanted to marry Bianca and often ignored Katherine, and most likely it is due to her negative attitude and poor disposition. It is a fact among people that if any man would want to marry Katherine, then it would be the same for Bianca. This is the reason why Katherine is a shrew that needs to be tamed. Enter Petruchio who is in desperate need of a wife and, as it plays out, Petruchio sets his sites on Katherine as her father cannot stand her anymore either and is willing to pay in order to marry her off.

As Petruchio begins to try and tame Katherine he becomes as annoying and harassing as she. But Petruchio understands that in order for him to be successful he must tame her without changing her inner spirit. For to do such a thing would break her original inner identity (her spirit) and this would be considered unethical. Although Shakespeare doesn’t use the word “grooming” he likens the taming to a “tailoring.” We experience these images of “tailoring” when he uses phrases like “Thy gown’s Why, aye. Come, tailor, let us see’st. / O mercy, God! What masquing stuff is here’s / What’s this A sleeve’s Tis like a demi-cannon. / What, up and down, carved like an apple tart’s / Here’s snip and nip and cut and slish and slash, Like to a sensor in a barber’s shop”. It has been analyzed that he seeks to tame Katherine using acceptable ways, and without causing her heartache. And in the course of Petruchio’s taming he encounters many personalities of Katherine, no doubt, as a result of the imposed abuse.

In reading Dante Alighieri’s Purgatorio and the concept of formative virtue in Canto 25, a very interesting idea on how the spirits (Dante calls them shades) materialize upon death. It has to do with an idea of Informative Virtues, a philosophical idea that the regenerative power of the seed creates similar life forms. An example Dante used in this canto was a sea-fungus, when it undertakes the reorganization process of meiosis, the seed takes on the virtue from the generator’s heart. Upon death, the soul takes on an aerial body and will stand either on the River Archeron (to await Hell) or stand on the River Tiber (to await salvation). Thus, upon death, all souls according to their hearts are either damned or saved. The allegory used here recalls Luke 6:43–45 where Jesus taught that good trees produce good fruits and likewise, bad trees will produce bad fruits. (logic)

The connection we can draw is in the sacrament of baptism as a religious ritual and the cleansing transcendental experience rooted in religious commitment and study, if we place this against acts of genocide also a ritualized form of behavior where ritualized acts of “cleansing” are utilized, we can come to a formal understanding of how subtle a device linguistics and semiotics in philosophy can be when these ideas of baptism and cleansing are transformed in the nonvirtuous person’s mind. An idea I have termed “informative nonvirtue” with the intent of turning a person’s will to bend toward the wishes of the controller. Albeit, in the spirit of higher academic learning, the “taming in marriage” as analyzed in Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew is meant to convey the idea that although the trials and tribulations of consecrated marriage are sometimes painful for those who lie under its burdens, burdens that are willfully consented to, those tribulations can yield beautiful results as pain and suffering have the ability to transcend living souls to higher planes of existence. And in that we mean, maturity.

In terms of the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking and group psychopathology where there is neither a contract of agreed formal consent to participate as a “willing participant” or “member” of the Group’s (Gang’s) activities nor a recognized legal ritual that condones such behavior as an acceptable part of societal living, such as we see in the consecration of sacraments of Eucharist and Penance. In this light, there is a burden placed, unwillingly I might add, on the victim which forces him or her to sacrifice their identity and suffer losses of not only the body and mind but of civil liberties as well, Fourth Amendment civil liberties. Here I used Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel’s reference to a movie shown in Paris during the 1970s entitled The Corpse Incinerator and its psychoanalytic connections to genocide. The story is of a criminal pervert necrophile which makes a perfect example to demonstrate the metempsychosis that in all things annihilation does not exist and that things simply “change form.” In the changing of form we can illustrate the victim’s “loss of identity.” The main character in the movie is a crematorium worker who believes how beautiful a thing death is and that it is in death that one is freed from the soul. The body is clearly likened to a “blemish” that the main character in the movie helps to get rid of. He himself will become the murderer of his wife and children because they have “impure blood” in them. We see the use of mysticism to magnify the power of the pervert to remove all “fecal character to transform excrement into gold and to transform digestion — which in the movie is combustion, just like incineration — into a marvelous alchemy freeing the soul from the body which has become nothing more than refuse.” Bela Grunberger (1959), and a contemporary psychoanalyst to Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel, wrote of “digestion as a fragmentation of ingested food and its degradation into less and less differentiated elements, which progressively lose their former peculiarities, and forming finally a homogeneous mass, the fecal bolus.” In this movie, the fetish is combustion/incineration. We can compare the incinerator itself as the main character’s counter-phobic object which acts much like the counter-phobic objects we might see used by many religious individuals and mystics known as amulets and crystals. In this light, we can then theorize the fetish is witnessing the destruction through a “changing of form” such as in the sexual deviance of body inflation fantasies. The counterphobic object, when it comes to the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking, is the mechanical electronic device that offers the perpetrator control over the victim’s body/mind/and outcomes. In the fetish of body inflation fantasies, in particular, those that restrain partners thereby making them immobile, the counter phobic objects would be the rubber suits and air compressors they use to provide “relief” from unconscious phantoms lurking in the shadows of the pervert’s psyche and to which provide the pervert satisfaction in overcoming such phantoms.

The Freudian connections to human sexuality, in particular of those belonging to the anal stage (anility) and resulting psychopathology of the anal-sadistic universe, can be drawn and concluded in both literary readings as one can imagine how distorted beliefs can inform logic and in the following notes gleaned from Dante’s Purgatorio and the Catholic Church’s idea of purging the soul of sins as a realm in the afterlife following the death of an unpure soul and to which the whole idea of penance and punishments is supposed to accomplish. However, penance and punishment, as a form of “cleansing the soul” and the transcendental experience of growth through “marriage” is done between two groups or two individual members of a society consenting to the ritualized agreed-upon behavior.

In making an analysis between the two literary comparisons and considering the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking where there is neither a contract of agreed formal consent to participate as a willing participant or a member in the ritualized activities nor is it neither recognized as a legal religious ritual or even acceptable secular ritual that is permitted by law. So, to allow the behavior of stalking to continue as part of ritualized societal living is an abomination. As such, we see in the consecration of the sacraments of Eucharist and Penance an agreed-upon, acceptable form of ritualized behavior that doesn’t inflict harm on society. In terms of the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking and group psychopathology, there is a burden placed, unwillingly I might add, on the victim which forces him or her to sacrifice their identity and suffer losses of the body and mind through ritualized punishments. Here I used Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel’s reference to a movie shown in Paris during the 1970s entitled The Corpse Incinerator, mentioned above, and its psychoanalytic connections to genocide and other forms of ethnic as well as religious cleansings (Holocausts and Inquisitions).

In further analysis, the idea of formative virtue is explained by Statius. Statius explains the part of the body’s blood that is responsible for sperm production is never used by the body except to create life. They had an understanding of how life-giving blood was shared in the activity of coitus and childbearing, although this particular explanation lacks scientific clarity. Statius explains, that it never enters the veins but rather enters another way. Thus, Virtue Informative, (meiosis process) takes place when this blood enters the “natural vase” of a woman’s womb through recombination of DNA. It is in this vaginal vase where the two blood types intermingle to create one life. Dante describes the female as “passive” and the male as “active.” Freud would later come to use this reasoning of “active” and “passive” gender roles of sexuality in his formulation of an entirely new field of study known as psychoanalysis. And by this “active virtue,” the soul is created. That is, the male is responsible for passing the virtues of his heart to his offspring. No doubt there was an observed understanding of active masculinities, most likely observed in warfare as the male-on-male acts of aggression. Statius explains further, much like a sea-fungus, when the reorganization process takes place in the womb, this power comes from “the powers whose seed it is.” That is, a sea-fungus will regenerate into another sea-fungus, likewise, a heart full of evil virtues will regenerate another full of evil virtues. Like begets like. “Nature is intent on all its members.” This idea is expressed in Luke 6:43–45 when Jesus says “good trees produce good fruits and likewise, bad trees produce bad fruits. Thus, the primal Motor, God, brings life into the soul by breathing intellectual life into it. “For without God, nothing is possible.” This understanding would influence Western thinking for quite some time, providing male patriarchy the power. However, it isn’t until the works of Melanie Klein we come to understand, in psychoanalytic terms, the power of nurture and the maternal vertical influence on the masculine and feminine psyche.

To continue Statius explanation, he says that as a result of this “active virtue”, the three aspects of the soul are created; memory, intelligence, and will. When freed from our earthly bodies; memory, intelligence and will become more active and upon death, the Informative Virtue of the body draws on the air around it to produce a visible aerial body. The spirits (shades) Dante sees in the afterlife are a result of this process. This is the reason Statius gives as to the emancipated soul's appearance on the Terrace of Gluttony. Interestingly, Peter Bondanella and Julia Conaway Bondanella state that church doctrine supported the idea that after death, the soul remained without anybody until Judgment Day, at which time it would be resurrected as a whole body. Of course, this reasoning is most likely derived from the fact the Bible expresses a more black and white view of salvation. You are either saved or you are not. Purgatory is a completely new philosophical device derived from the writings of an Italian man who lived during the 13th and 14th centuries, Dante. Another connection to the formulation of Purgatory and the Catholic Church’s institution of confession and penance as another ritualized form of behavior and to which has not only been incorporated into Church doctrine but has changed shape over time. The Catholic Church’s awareness, as a reasoning logic, is confession as a form of “talk therapy,” helps cleanse the soul or “purge” the soul of its impurities. It is at this point we can make another connection to the clandestine eavesdropping taking place with regard to my personal form of targeting. Guilty men don’t confess their sins. Well, those guilty men lacking a conscience and who are smart enough to keep quiet. Another aspect to this understanding is that grown men and women, who as young children had their conscience formed and shaped as subjects under this Catholic Church doctrine cannot sleep well at night unless they confess their sins. Those who have achieved a conscious awareness and have become mindful of their actions. This is the idea between my notion of “nonvirtue informative” and virtue informative and where love and respect for God and Jesus prevails and promotes the idea of “supernatural happiness” or “overall happiness” of the individual as analyzed in The Taming of The Shrew.

The Terrace of Lust and The “Purging” Through Electromagnetic Tailoring (aka Grooming) and Targeted Assaults

In Dante’s Purgatorio, when Virgil, Statius, and Dante arrive on the Terrace of Lust, they witness a wall of flames that shoots forth. Flames of fire from the inner wall to the outside wall that lick heat and fire. The canto implies these shooting flames are intermittent, frequent blasts that drive the souls back. As a result, the three must walk closely to the outside wall so as not to be burned. The souls on this terrace are chanting in Latin, “Summoe Deus dlementioe” which means “God of Supreme clemency.” They also shout, “Virum non cognosco” which means “I know not a man.” At the end of the canto an example of chastity is taken from the classical literature of the god Diana who ran to the woods to protect her own chastity through isolation, seclusion as a result of shame, and is attributed to a very feminine psychological element. Diana is the personification of femininity.

In this canto, the connection between the shooting and licking flames that burst forth that “drive the souls back” who committed the sin of Lust in their lifetimes can be compared to Petruchio’s taming of Katherine as well as the electromagnetic frequencies cast in electronic torture and psychotronic torture. This symbolism of “reforming the subject” is recreated and carried out in Group (Gang) Stalking with electromagnetic targeted physical assaults and psychotronic torture. Of course, on all of Dante’s terraces in his Purgatorio we observer this concept of “grooming” or “reforming the subject”, and as Shakespeare would say it, “a tailoring” through “snip and nip and cut and slash” or subjugation through power and electricity. Hence the chanting phrase, “Summoe Deus Dlementioe” or “God of Supreme clemency.” The God of Supreme forgiveness. We can make this connection between a “Supreme God” and “his followers”, the value in a possessed treasure of a wife as analyzed in The Taming of The Shrew and the power of Despots over the “human trash that makes life in his street part of the world of the unclean.” To which of these three areas do the nonvirtuous activities of Group (Gang) Stalking belong? A Supreme God, the possessed treasure of a wife, or the despot’s power to “transform the human garbage that litters his streets into fucking gold through technological service security surveillance as a paid-for product?”

Sources:

Alighieri, Dante. (2005) The Purgatorio. Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. New York. Barnes & Nobel Classics. Originally published in Italian during the 14th century.

Shakespeare, William. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. Reprinted from a folio dated 1632. Stanford, CT. Longmeadow Press. (pp. 287 –313).

New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures. Brooklyn, NY. Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc. Book of Luke.

Chasseguet-Smirgel, Janine. (1984). Creativity and Perversion. London. Free Association Books.

Chodorow, Nancy J. (2012). Individualizing Gender and Sexuality: Theory and Practice. Relational Books Perspective, Volume 53. New York. Routledge; Taylor & Francis Group.

Gates, Katherine. (2000). Deviant Desires: Incredibly Strange Sex. New York. Juno Books.

Sheridan, Lorraine; James, David V.; and Roth, Jayden. (March 12, 2020) The Phenomenology of Group Stalking (‘Gang Stalking’): A Content Analysis of Subjective Experiences. International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health. 17(7), 2506. https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/7/2506/htm#B5-ijerph-17-02506

Sigmund, Freud. (1931). Libidinal Types. Standard Edition. Volume 21. (217–220).

_____________ (1931). Female Sexuality. Standard Edition. Volume 21. (223–243).

_____________ (1933). New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis. Standard Edition. Volume 22. (3 -182)

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