Maid to Order: The Commercial Fetishism of High Technologies in the Era of the Electronically Targeted Individual

The new age of computer technology and wireless devices has given rise to issues surrounding cyber-surveillance (illegal security-service surveillance) and has been associated with crimes like cyberstalking, sextortion, murder, cyber misbehavior, and terrorizing intimate partners with newly developed 21st-century technologies, and to which encompass the United States “National Security Cyber Investigation” in the 21st century and beyond (The United States Attorney’s Bulletin, 2016; Department of Justice Journal of Federal Law and Practice, 2019).

Just like Madonna’s erotic photo album “Sex” is filled with the theatrical paraphernalia of BDSM: boots, chains, leather, whips, masks, costumes, and scripts, so too, is there a potential for newly advancing technologies that seek to subjugate Objects (victims) using an electromagnetic tether and electronic devices to control the victim. These high technologies provide an avenue for the sexual pervert to carry out a form of BDSM in fantasy. To warn of the ominous dangers inherent in these new advancing “service-security surveillance” technologies, technologies that are at play as part of the phenomenon otherwise known as the electronically targeted individual, become grossly understated (Douglas, Harris & Dragiewicz, 2019). Like BDSM, these new advancing technologies target, harass, assault, and torture victims and it runs the risk of unleashing a truly insidious dark side found within human nature itself. A power unleashed on an unsuspecting greater public with even more horror. Its uses are of particular danger to women, children, and anyone lacking power. People belonging to minority groups who lacking education, wealth, and connections of power to defend against it. For the most part, it has been women who run the risk of being raped, but children are also in danger at the hands of pedophiles. Homosexuals and transgender men and women are also targets of violence. A new tide has been unleashed in the era of the 21st century, and it is one that may bring with it a murderous and disastrous undoing.

Harnessing control of the human body utilizing radiological devices (electronic devices that respond to frequency) against the will of the human target is one of the most insidious and clandestine attempts of absolute power rooted in the paranoid-schizoid personality position. Its attempt to humiliate and dehumanize, usurping power away from human Objects (victims) is on par with the murderous machinery of the Holocaust and the inhumane experiments that followed in its aftermath performed by Nazi doctors (see Jacobs, 2007). Its actions are rooted in psychotic fantasies of the primal scene and because of its cloak of invisibility, a concept of crisis has developed. How are we to adequately describe these invisible violations if we can’t accurately explain what they are?

In the theatre of BDSM, patriarchy’s traditional theme is offered. The theme that manhood is synonymous with mastery, and submission is bound to female fate (see Neidecken, 2016; Knafo & Feiner, 1996; Knafo & Feiner, 2006). In the theatre of BDSM, a dominant’s foot may be presented as bound and a leash straps him or her to the neck of their submissive. This bondage fetish performs identity in theatre performance and displays for an audience that power is intertwined with independence. Scenes of bondage are often stapled with scenes of abandonment and separation. For if it were to display unity, there would be no need for the props it utilizes; chains, whips, handcuffs, blindfolds, leather leashes, straps, and wooden paddles (Madonna, 1992). Sex as high theatre and in the world of BDSM, high theatre parades images of servile obedience in the conventional modes of power. BDSM is situated within primal scene symbolism and it borrows its power from the everyday scenes of the cultural economies it is found in. Money, prisons, dungeons, bathrooms, and the houses of elite empires. In reality, it is nothing more than psychopathologies of the flesh. According to Richard von Krafft-Ebing, “Sadism was an aberrant and atavistic manifestation of the “innate desire to humiliate, hurt, wound, or even destroy others in order thereby to create sexual pleasure in one’s self (McClintock, 2013).” In the intercourse of the sexes, sexuality affords both men and women, not only the power but the greater pleasure in “winning over,” and “conquering.” It was Krafft-Ebing’s opinion that while men tend toward aggressive postures, women derive pleasure from innate coyness and, with her victory over attracting the gaze of her male aggressor, affords her intense gratification and satisfaction (McClintock, 2013). Especially when it runs against other females in competition for sex (Sarteschi, 2017). For the most part, men and women utilize violence in two very different ways. Similar to Krafft-Ebing’s opinion, statistical records record that the percentages of violence and favors male aggression (Fox & Fridel, 2017; Hudak, Corry, Schwimmer & Rupp, 2020). Whereas women tend toward more passive-aggressive modes of aggression, utilizing more hidden and clandestine alternatives (e.g., deception, pathological lying, and high impression management).

It is my opinion, I have an adult child harassing me, utilizing power over me with the use of electronic devices that respond to electromagnetic frequency signals (radio waves). A personality void of empathy and the capacity to feel any real concern for the welfare of others. He plays with me like a toy, a remote-control human toy. And in my opinion, it is one of the grandest criminal conspiracies rooted in organized crime I have ever come to know. This phenomenon possesses such a threat to the national security of the United States of America, that I fear for everyone’s safety in defense against it because it has harnessed the power to inflict even greater harm on American citizens walking freely within our country’s borders by usurping free will and acting as that person’s individual sovereign. It is bigger than just gang stalking. It has the power to control people like cattle. Like Hitler did with the Jews, it corrals people like livestock and groups them together as something “other.” And where ever there is absolute power, absolute virtue never follows. We know this from past history. Tyrants are little children who have never learned how to navigate loss and separation and mature into proper adult development (see Yardley, 2004). In a paper entitled “Dark Triad, Tramps, and Thieves” the authors write:

“Despite the obvious importance of individual differences in understanding offending behavior (e.g., Miller & Lynam, 2001; Wilcox, Sullivan, Jones, & van Gelder, 2014), there has been relatively little research exploring the relationships between personality and petty thefts in non-incarcerated adults (Lyons, & Jonason, 2015).”

This means there is a clinical lack of understanding regarding sadism's relationship to personality within the population of non-incarcerated adults. That is to say, there is a tremendous lacuna in the research literature with regard to the prevalence of sadistic traits and their connection to personality in the world of non-incarcerated adults today, and how these individual-specific sadistic traits contribute to the invisible crime of electronic targeting. Because Lyons and Jonason’s research was based on the information provided by the self-reported crime that went unnoticed, it reveals to us the higher prevalence of sadism within adult non-incarcerated populations. This data is usually obtained by researchers utilizing the information provided by prison institutions who have access to the base of clinical evidence for incarcerated populations (see Lyons & Jonason, 2015; Buckels, Jones, & Paulhus, 2013; Johnson, Plouffe, & Saklofske, 2019; Krick, Tresp, Vatter, Ludwig, Wihlenda, & Rettenberger, 2016; Nitschke, Mokros, Osterheider, & Marshall, 2013).

Primal scene experiences and fantasies are viewed as a blueprint for internalized object relationships. The concept of the primal scene dramatically depicts a blending of past and present, fantasy and reality in the child’s relationships (see Niedecken, 2016; Knafo & Feiner, 1996; Knafo & Feiner, 2006). So, his use of objects in identificatory ways reveals to the onlooker his unanalyzed unconscious connection which speaks of a “human absence,” an empty and impoverished childhood. Because his behavior demonstrates a great absence in his ability to “connect” with the Object interpersonally, he uses a theatre stage with inanimate props and human subjects. In order for the perpetrator to establish his “connection” with one of his victims, he must utilize a prop that serves as an intermediary position, an electronic device. A device that functions as a counter-phobic object to ward of anxieties induced by this Object (Fabozzi, 2016; Gaddini, 2003; Galligan, 1994; Chatterji, 2009; Hull, 2004); electronic technology in the form of a handheld toy. Once he creates this “connection” he establishes a remote, from a distance, approach to establishing a relationship with the human target and thereby “wins” his “possession” based on unequal advantage (Winnicott, 1971). The stage of sexual commerce of BDSM is the transformation of power (Chescheir & Schulz, 2004), and this transformation is also witnessed in domestic violence and terrorism. This technology is no different than rape (Conaghan, 2019) or the coercive control used by the abuser in intimate partner relationships (Stark, 2007). It demonstrates a deeply troubled mind in terms of object relations, and I am going to theorize this troubling behavior may be the product of avoidant or ambivalent attachment in childhood (Wallin, 2007). Children who suffer from avoidant attachment possess the greatest potential for inflicting harm. As a result of avoidant attachment, persistent parental abandonment, and neglect force the child to play independently by himself with his toy props. These children appear very well behaved to onlookers because they don’t cry once their parental objects have left the room. And because of this persistent parental abandonment and neglect, the child may have trouble establishing relationships in adulthood. This troubling behavior may also be due to a learning disability like autism. It may also be the result of “payback” for some perceived wrong and the human Object (victim) has now become part of the “bad breast” in the paranoid splitting of the mother. The paranoid-schizoid personality suffers from the psychic splitting of the mother into two parts; the good breast and the bad breast (see Jacobs, 2007). It is also termed the ambivalent breast which makes up ambivalent attachment. Either way, whatever is at the root of this troublesome behavior it MUST be stopped!!!

Source references that have provided me a window of clarity and a better perspective on the subject matter at hand follow here:

Buckels, E., Jones, D., & Paulhus, D. (2013). Behavioral Confirmation of Everyday Sadism. Psychological Science, 24(11), 2201–2209.

Chatterji, A. (2009). “Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious” and D.W. Winnicott’s Transitional and Related Phenomena. The Psychoanalytic Review, 96(5), 785–800.

Chescheir, M., & Schulz, K. (2004). The development of a capacity for concern in antisocial children: Winnicott’s concept of human relatedness. Clinical Social Work Journal, 17(1), 24–39.

Conaghan, .J. (2019). The Essence of Rape. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, 39(1),

Cybercrime and Cyber Threats. Department of Justice Journal of Federal Law and Practice. United States Department of Justice. Vol. 67, №1. February 2019.

Cyber Misbehavior. The United States Attorneys’ Bulletin. Department of Justice. Vol. 64, №3. May 2016.

Douglas, H., Harris, B.A., & Dragiewicz, .M. (2019). Technology-facilitated Domestic and Family Violence: Women’s Experiences. The British Journal of Criminology, 59(3),

Fabozzi, P. (2016). The Use of the Analyst and the Sense of Being Real: The Clinical Meaning of Winnicott’s “The Use of an Object.” The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 85(1), 1–34.

Fox, James A., & Fridel, Emma E., Phd. (2017) Gender Differences in Patterns and Trends in U.S. Homicide, 1976–2015. Violence and Gender, Vol. 4, №2.

Gaddini, R. (2003). The Precursors of Transitional Objects and Phenomena. Psychoanalysis and History, 5(1), 53–61.

Galligan, A. (1994). Transitional Objects: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 7(4),

Hudak, L., Corry, D., Schwimmer, H., & Rupp, J. (2020) Firearm-Facilitated Sexual Assault: Using Emergency Department Data to Provide a Novel Perspective of the Problem. Violence and Gender. Vol. 7., №1.

Hull, J. (2004). Videogames: Transitional phenomena in adolescence. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 2(2), 106–113.

Jacobs, Amber. (2007). On Matricide: Myth, Psychoanalysis, and the Law of the Mother. New York. Columbia University Press.

Johnson, L., Plouffe, R., & Saklofske, D. (2019). Subclinical Sadism and the Dark Triad. Journal of Individual Differences, 40(3), 127–133.

Knafo, D., & Feiner, K. (1996). The Primal Scene: Variations on a Theme. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 44(2), 549–569.

Knafo, D., & Feiner, K. (2006). Unconscious Fantasies and the Relational World. Hillside, NJ. The Analytic Press, Inc. Part of the “Relational Perspective Book Series,” Volume 31.

Krick, A., Tresp, S., Vatter, M., Ludwig, A., Wihlenda, M., & Rettenberger, M. (2016). The Relationships Between the Dark Triad, the Moral Judgment Level, and the Students’ Disciplinary Choice. Journal of Individual Differences, 37(1), 24–30.

Lyons, M., & Jonason, P. (2015). Dark Triad, Tramps, and Thieves. Journal of Individual Differences, 36(4), 215–220.

Madonna. Sex. Published by Warner Books. https://archive.org/details/sex_20190913/page/n1/mode/2up

McClintock, Anne. (1993) “Maid to Order: Commercial Fetishism and Gender Power. Social Text. №37, A Special Section Edited by Anne McClintock Explores the Sex Trade (Winter 1993), pp.87–116. Duke University Press. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/94de/42b7efda8383d0484d0265d39be4e4a18906.pdf?_ga=2.88683026.869618494.1612888872-1035488512.1612888872

Miller, J.D., & Lynam, D. (2001). Structural models of personality and their relation to antisocial behaviour: A meta-analytic review. Criminology, 39, 765–798.

Niedecken, D. (2016). The primal scene and symbol formation. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 97(3), 665–683.

Nitschke, J., Mokros, A., Osterheider, M., & Marshall, W. (2013). Sexual Sadism. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 57(12), 1441–1453.

Sarteschi, Christine M., (2017). “Jodi Arias: A Case of Extreme Violence.” Violence and Gender. Vol. 4, №3. (September 2017).

Stark, Evan (2007) Coercive Control: Entrapment of women in everyday life. New York. Oxford University Press.

Wallin, David J. (2007). Attachment in Psychotherapy. New York. The Guilford Press.

Wilcox, P., Sullivan, C.J., Jones, S., & van Gelder, J.L. (2014). Personality and opportunity: An integrated approach to offending and victimization. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 41, 880–901.

Winnicott, D.W. (1971). “The use of the Object and relating through identifications.” In Playing and Reality. Harmondsworth. Penguin, 1980.

Yardley, S. (2004). Response to Lovell: “Cognitive Development and Empathy”. Journal of Adult Development, 6(4), 227–229.

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Victim of gang stalking & electronic torture. I write about feminism and gender difference. Email: TheSpeculumOfTheOther@yahoo.com

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Karen Barna

Karen Barna

Victim of gang stalking & electronic torture. I write about feminism and gender difference. Email: TheSpeculumOfTheOther@yahoo.com

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