The Riddle of Group (Gang) Stalking and Uncovering Some of its “Secret Peculiarities”: A forensic analysis of one individual case study

This post provides a bit more in terms of a forensic analysis of feminine infantile narcissism and object love and its consequential resulting psychopathologies and healthy object selection in the development of normal self-esteem. But more importantly, address the question I left hanging at the bottom of my last post which is:

“How does Freud’s riddle of femininity and the “secret peculiarities” of feminine psychopathology fit into the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking with electronic targeted physical assaults? HINT: knowing age is a determinant to violence even petty passive-aggressive violence

In my previous post, I wrote about some of the “secret peculiarities” of female psychopathologies and some of these characteristics being rooted in immature feminine growth and development. Freud noted there were distinctly evidenced specific traits attributed to femininity such as high degrees of narcissism and a more important desire for them to be loved than to love and this affected their object selection. Otto Kernberg, a psychoanalyst and professor of psychiatry known for his psychoanalytic theories on borderline personality organization and narcissistic pathology, believed normal infantile narcissism in the development of the role the self plays in one’s life is dependent on two things. First, the affirmation of others, and second, the acquisition of desirable and appealing objects which later develops into normal healthy self-esteem. These object selections, as an example, maybe a young girl’s desire for sports/weight training (development for acquiring a metaphorical phallus through competitive competition) or a young girl’s desire for fashion design. Faulty developmental influences can contribute to feminine psychopathologies and persistent egocentricity which contributes to her repetition drive in assaulting others. As an example of such faulty developmental object choices, we might observe a young girl’s desire to become a gang member, part of an organized criminal group where she will receive affirmations regarding her “value to the group”, where worth is determined by the level of violence one is capable of carrying out and/or the selection of drugs and alcohol as substances with which to deal and distribute. This abnormal choice in object selection is often witnessed in cases of parental neglect, abuse, and poverty. Theories central to the analysis of such feminine psychopathologies are primarily Freudian as well as belonging to other ego developmental theories pertinent to psychology like Otto Kernberg and Heinz Kohut and Kleinian object relation theory as well as other object relations perspectives such Donald Winnicott, Robert Fairbain, and John Bowlby.

Since attachments are never fixed as the human psyche is malleable through natural aging and development, the possibility to become unhinged from the arrival at a fixed and normal state as a result of academic work-study and mourning life losses, is always a lurking possibility for all of us, and to which the psychopath knows very well as do psychoanalysts and psychiatrists. We know this because of the pioneering work that has been done and which is central to integrating postwar ego psychology. That is to say, the effects of trauma on the patient and the role trauma plays in undoing otherwise normal healthy growth, healthy attachment, and development. The developmental psychology of the self and the object self in relation to other objects in the environment, under normal conditions, should remain fixed and stable. Under abnormal conditions, a normal stable self can be unraveled and fall into patterns of violence and addiction. This is what postwar psychoanalytic has taught us and to which I believe the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking is being deployed.

I had posited a question at the end of my previous writing, Freud’s Riddle of Femininity and Some of the “Secret Peculiarities” of Female Psychopathologies,

“How does Freud’s riddle of femininity and the “secret peculiarities” of feminine psychopathology fit into the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking with electronic targeted physical assaults? HINT: knowing age is a determinant to violence even petty passive-aggressive violence

We know from reading Shakespeare’s rather comical play, The Taming of the Shrew, the ever-present human desire to control others, especially the opposite Object sex, is an ever-present revolving theme throughout human history. And we know the importance from reading Goethe, the meaning in asking “Is man tempered enough to tame his thirst for power and glory?” This has been an age-old preponderance stretching as far back as classical antiquity wondered about by the fathers of philosophy. And we can surmise society will continue to be an ever-present danger from the psychopath operating in the appearance of a savior welding an electronic weapon with which to “cure the mind” for the purpose of grooming and “tailoring” human subjects’ behavior to their own will.

In my independent studies of psychoanalysis, I have uncovered two areas in psychology specific to detrimental outcomes resulting from side effects from Group (Gang) Stalking with electronic targeted assaults and psychotronic torture. First, unhinging a person’s Internal Locus of Control through repetitive shocks to the human body/mind (trauma). I have included a post link in the resource section below. And secondly, unhinging fixed object attachments through trauma. That is reversing Kernberg’s requirements for the healthy development of self-esteem and the anti-thesis goes like this: First, the disaffirmation of other through punitive punishments (electronic targeted physical assaults and psychotronic torture) and second, the relinquishing of healthy desirable, and appealing object choices and the encouragements in unhealthy object choices with which to develop unhealthy self-esteem and deteriorating sense of self. Such is the change in lifestyle spoken about in the narrative of the phenomenology of Group (Gang) Stalking and often a consequence and side effect to trauma (Sheridan, L; James, D.; & Roth, J., 2020).

Heinz Kohut wrote in 1966 the following:

“Although in theoretical discussions it will usually not be disputed that narcissism, the libidinal investment of the self, is per se neither pathological nor obnoxious, there exists an understandable tendency to look at it with a negatively toned evaluation as soon as the field of theory is left. Where such a prejudice exists, it is undoubtedly based on a comparison between narcissism and object love, and is justified by the assertion that it is the more primitive and the less adaptive of the two forms of libido distribution.” Heinz Kohut, (1966)

In this quote, Kohut is saying that when individuals witness a healthy libidinal interest in the investment of the self, there is usually a tendency to look negatively at it in toned evaluation as soon as we walk away from the study of psychoanalytic theory. In this light, let’s compare the libidinal investment of the self as taking care of their body through healthy diet and exercise (aerobics/weight lifting) as “primitive” and “less adaptive” in terms of “civilized living.” And here, we often hear such people called “lunks”, “jug heads”, or “meatheads”. Of course, referring to their lack of intelligence or aptitude a belief that contributes to the myth-making and hatred against aesthetic physical bodies. Whereas, if the libidinal investment of the self is made in terms of rigorous course work in academics and the development of social bonding within academic groups and where there is less concentration on physical work activity but more mental work in pursuit of higher intelligence (IQ) and a“civilized lifestyle” there seems to be more of an understanding because most people do not have the time nor the resources to dedicate their lives to creating the “perfect body.” When one was in high school, most people witnessed this as “the jock” versus “the nerd” wars. This says something about the juvenile level of narcissism involved in my experiences specifically related to Group (Gang) Stalking with electronic targeted assault and psychotronic torture; and Heinz Kohut says this prejudice regarding libidinal investments of the self exists, undoubtedly, as the result in one’s comparison between their own self narcissistic interests and object love choices against the backdrop of another’s narcissistic interests and object love choices. (And we wonder about the high degrees of narcissism found among Facebook users?) That is to say, that the libidinal investment of one’s own narcissism is in terms of their own peculiar object love selections which are then cast into the shadows of wondering doubt in their own psyche when placed next to others’ narcissistic interests and object love choice. As a result, the resulting insecurities and feelings of inferiority displace original feelings of a secure self, and this results in a display of negative toned evaluation of the Object other. Simply ask yourself what do you value and what are you intimidated by when placed up against other objects in your relational world? Do you value having the best-looking aesthetic physique (hard body), house, car or do you value having the best-looking brain (aptitude of intelligence — IQ)? In the case of Facebook users, when individuals preview other individual’s social media timeline may ask, “What is my worth?” “Do I, in fact, “measure up.” This is something we all do; doctors, lawyers, bus drivers, stay-at-home mothers, teachers, etc. However, those with faulty and abnormal self-esteem may react with aggressive recourse in attacking others. This has been my experience using Facebook and social media when one’s achievements are displayed in one’s timeline for all to see, it will inevitably affect someone who does not possess those same experiences. And someone who has not received adequate admiration and affirmations in their early childhood development may react with violence or passive-aggressive violence.

Here we can bring into the discussion Judith Butler’s writing The Force of Nonviolence: An ethico-political bind. Butler distills the problem down to a basic question of utility. The distillates materialize as one pre-emptive question and it is “What groups matter and what groups do not? Who are the valued individuals and who are nonvaluable and disposable? This simple question will, at times, seem to cloud even some of the best minds in psychoanalysis because it is as Jaques Lacan had written in 1978 in The Seminar of Jacques Lacan Book II, “The images of man’s body is the principle of every unity he perceives in objects . . . all the objects of his world are always structured around the wondering shadows of his own ego.” And it was Freud who said, “The body is first and foremost a bodily ego (Freud, 1923).” This is true for both females and males alike. Although the attributes to a masculine shape differ from the attributes of a feminine shape, they are both important and valued shapes by the corresponding subjects with regard to their “peculiar” and valued characteristics.

In Bodies that Matter: On the discursive limits of “sex”, Judith Butler provides us with an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the “matter” of bodies, sex, and gender and this holds true, at least as far as my personal experience with Group (Gang) Stalking, electronic targeted physical assault, and psychotronic torture. That is to say, there seems to be a very real heterosexual hegemony (ego and libidinal interest) with regard to certain cases of Group (Gang-Related) Stalking. Upon further analysis, we discover that bodies can move beyond the boundaries of their physical attributes and characteristics as in the quote “A man is more than just a man.” And for that matter, “A woman is more than just a woman.” Thereby placing the Objects outside of their realm of just another “sexualized body” with which to use and exploit. And what follows the negative toned evaluation of Other, oftentimes, ends up as acts of humiliation of Other rooted in the comparison of one’s own libidinal investment of one’s own narcissism in terms of one’s own peculiar object love selections against the backdrop of Other.

In a paper written in 2015 entitled, Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure: The Origin of an Instrument, about Mary Ainsworth’s development of the instrument known as “The Strange Situation” in which childhood attachment was evaluated, the paper quotes; “So powerful is this technique in evoking behavioral changes that it is likely to be used with increasing frequency in studies of mother-infant interactions (Ainsworth & Bell, 1970).” In like view, we might also say something similar regarding the “instruments” (electronic devices) used in the phenomenon of Group (Gang) Stalking. We could then compare these instruments of group (gang) related stalking and classify them as weapons and/or counterphobic mechanical objects and consider the theories of Donald Winnicott in which the child’s use of counterphobic inanimate objects exist to help defend and protect the child from resulting fears surrounding separation anxiety felt from perceived feelings of abandonment in the child. This sets up a possible forensic analysis as a perpetrator with a possible borderline personality disorder.

Sources:

Barna, Karen. Exploring Forensic Psychology: How gang stalking, electronic targeted physical assaults, and psychotronic torture diminish and compromise survival skills. Proclivities’ Principle Wisdom.wordpress.com. Published online May 18, 2021. https://proclivitiesprinciplewisdom.wordpress.com/2021/05/18/exploring-forensic-psychology-how-gang-stalking-electronic-targeted-physical-assaults-and-psychotronic-torture-diminish-and-compromise-survival-skills/

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